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baking

As we've mentioned in the past, the kitchen is a major source of disposable single-use waste in the home. Common baking tools such as soiled aluminum foil, baking paper, and packaging from ingredients are usually all headed to the landfill after being used.

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water filter

Water filtration is a problem that is felt globally and doesn't discriminate. While this week's suggestions focus on individual-level water filtration options for you to minimize your waste in your personal life, consider donating to a water-based organization to help bring clean water to everyone

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kitchen utensils

Global plastic production has been on the rise since the 1950's, replacing materials like wood, stainless steel, and glass. However, when it comes to your kitchen, you have plenty of ways to avoid relying on plastic, particularly when it comes to kitchen utensils. Learn more...

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water bottles

In 2016, more than 480bn water bottles were produced up from 300bn back in 2004, and the numbers keep rising. Although most water bottles are produced from recyclable plastic, efforts are failing to capture and recycle these often single-use bottles. Learn more...

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making tea

Did you know that tea bags usually have a sealant of plastic called polypropylene? In the UK alone, it’s estimated that 6 billion cups of tea are made every year, meaning that 150 tonnes of polypropylene are either headed to the landfill or contaminating unaware food waste compost piles. Learn more...

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making coffee

By now you’re probably aware of how wasteful the K-cup revolution has been, but there are more ways to be sustainable when making coffee than just the filtering. Don’t forget to take into consideration where the coffee came from, the energy used to boil the water (or not), and what to do with the leftover waste. Learn more...

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coffee cups

The typical "to-go" or "take away" coffee cup you'll get will be single-use and non-recyclable. To keep warmth and prevent sogginess, the cup is made from virgin pulp cardboard lined with a thin layer of plastic, making it basically impossible for recycling plants to separate. In 2015, an EPA post estimated 25 billion cups are disposed annually in the US. Learn more...

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plastic wrap

While some cities recycling centers may take #2, #3, and #4 plastics, plastic film most likely will be headed to the landfill due to its stretchy nature which jams machinery at recycling centers as well as the fact it’s often soiled with food. Learn more...

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food storage

According to a USDA study, about 31% of our food supply goes uneaten. Storing our food properly and efficiently can help combat this waste while saving you money and keeping your kitchen organized. Learn more...

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drinking straws

An estimated *500 million* straws are used and discarded in the US every day. The cons: straws are rarely recyclable, cannot biodegrade, add to our marine pollution, and have become part of our food chain by being ingested by marine and land animals

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