Sustain Your Shit Home About

Filter by:

airfresheners

It's pretty easy to ditch common air fresheners' plastic casing/packaging + artificial fragrance concoctions. Going the DIY route or using straight baking soda lets you be aware of ingredients (you can easily go an all-natural route based on spices, herbs, and fruit for DIY) and allows you to avoid unnecessary single-use plastic.

Read more

baking

As we've mentioned in the past, the kitchen is a major source of disposable single-use waste in the home. Common baking tools such as soiled aluminum foil, baking paper, and packaging from ingredients are usually all headed to the landfill after being used.

Read more

menstrual hygiene

There's so much to discuss this week regarding menstrual hygiene: the inaccessibility of products for certain populations, the secrecy of ingredients in pads/tampons, the waste due to single-use disposable options, and finally the high lifetime cost.

Read more

diapers

The EPA estimates that the U.S. disposes of ~20 billion single-use diapers per year into landfills where they take up to 500 years to degrade while creating methane in the process. Disposable diapers cost families around $4,000 over a two year period.

Read more

water filter

Water filtration is a problem that is felt globally and doesn't discriminate. While this week's suggestions focus on individual-level water filtration options for you to minimize your waste in your personal life, consider donating to a water-based organization to help bring clean water to everyone

Read more

lip balm

We hear over and over again the now prevalent fact that estimates say that by 2050 there will be more plastic in the ocean than fish. In cosmetics in particular, many brands will overuse plastic for marketing or to exaggerate the size of what you're actually purchasing.

Read more

kitchen utensils

Global plastic production has been on the rise since the 1950's, replacing materials like wood, stainless steel, and glass. However, when it comes to your kitchen, you have plenty of ways to avoid relying on plastic, particularly when it comes to kitchen utensils. Learn more...

Read more

drying clothes

While washing and drying machines have become more energy and water efficient over the years, the total amount of energy used to launder clothes keeps going up because we rely on dryers now more than ever. As part of looking at the laundry experience, let's improve our drying habits.

Read more

deodorant

The bathroom is an easy spot to let single-use disposables and unnecessary packaging into your life, but that also means it's an easy spot to make a big impact. According to Oceana, the average American throws out around 300 lbs of packaging a year; make an impact by switching up your deodorant. Learn more...

Read more

eating out

It's become more common for restaurants (not only fast-food places, but order-at-the-counter and sit-down as well) to provide only single-use, often plastic, disposable options for eating your meal. As a consumer, you can help combat the waste by bringing your own reusable items.

Read more

conditioner

The bathroom is one of the easiest places to start cutting down on single-use packaging. Consider finding plastic-free alternatives to buying things like conditioner, especially since many countries are struggling to process recycled material with China’s recent restrictions on imported solid waste. Learn more...

Read more

dish scrubbing

While a great first step is examining the soap you use to clean dishes, next you should consider the implement you're using. Common grocery store scrubber brushes are usually made from non-biodegradable plastic and have a short lifespan before becoming unusable. Learn more...

Read more

water bottles

In 2016, more than 480bn water bottles were produced up from 300bn back in 2004, and the numbers keep rising. Although most water bottles are produced from recyclable plastic, efforts are failing to capture and recycle these often single-use bottles. Learn more...

Read more

floss

Flossing is an unavoidable and essential part of dental hygiene, but that doesn’t mean you need to resort to those pesky single-use disposable picks or floss that comes in plastic containers way larger than the actual spools they contain. Learn more...

Read more

reading

Books are essential to both everyone’s education and enjoyment, but the concern of deforestation can make anyone pause before buying a book. The WWF estimates we’re losing ~18.7 million acres of forests every year; however, options exist that allow you to avoid purchasing virgin pulp paper books. Learn more...

Read more

making tea

Did you know that tea bags usually have a sealant of plastic called polypropylene? In the UK alone, it’s estimated that 6 billion cups of tea are made every year, meaning that 150 tonnes of polypropylene are either headed to the landfill or contaminating unaware food waste compost piles. Learn more...

Read more

hand soap

Washing your hands is an unavoidable and necessary task (for both cleanliness + health), but we can be sustainable when thinking of both the ingredients and packaging. Ditching packaging whenever possible is ideal, and there's a lot to consider when thinking about the sourcing and usage of certain ingredients. Learn more...

Read more

hair drying

Appliances make up about 35% of your household energy usage, and due to their wattage, hair dryers are surprising energy hogs considering their small size. Depending on how often you blow dry your hair, it could be costing you anywhere from ~$30-45/year! Learn more...

Read more

making coffee

By now you’re probably aware of how wasteful the K-cup revolution has been, but there are more ways to be sustainable when making coffee than just the filtering. Don’t forget to take into consideration where the coffee came from, the energy used to boil the water (or not), and what to do with the leftover waste. Learn more...

Read more

trash bags

Like many topics before, trash bag issues center around the use of virgin plastic and plastic pollution in the environment. Since trash bags are picked up stuffed with wet garbage, they’re never separated from their contents and the plastic goes straight to the landfill or incinerator. Learn more...

Read more

shampoo

Check out any typical American bathroom and you’ll find single-use plastic containers abound, shampoo and hair products in particular. Plastic is accumulating at an alarming pace with only 9% of plastic waste being recycled and plastic packaging accounting for 40% of non-fiber plastic being made. Learn more...

Read more

bulk shopping

Bulk shopping may be one of the easiest ways to curb your yearly waste. Grocery shopping is usually at least a weekly occurrence, and by avoiding food packaging, you’ll decrease what goes out in your trash can + recycling bin each week. Learn more...

Read more

facial tissue

ying into similar past topics, facial tissue (aka kleenex) contributes to your yearly paper consumption, and brands you buy in the grocery store or drugstore are often made unnecessarily using virgin tree pulp. Curb your paper consumption, particularly during this sickness season, by looking for alternatives. Learn more...

Read more

dog poo

Dog poo isn’t just unsightly and gross, but can cause dead spots on lawns and contaminates our water supply with a plethora of diseases, viruses, and parasites. While estimates range, a good guess would be that in the US, dogs produce about 10.6 million tons of poop per year! Learn more...

Read more

coffee cups

The typical "to-go" or "take away" coffee cup you'll get will be single-use and non-recyclable. To keep warmth and prevent sogginess, the cup is made from virgin pulp cardboard lined with a thin layer of plastic, making it basically impossible for recycling plants to separate. In 2015, an EPA post estimated 25 billion cups are disposed annually in the US. Learn more...

Read more

toothpaste

It's difficult to know what materials your toothpaste packaging is made of to know if it's accepted in your curbside pickup, and proper recycling requires cleaning and preparation. Some major brands have started recycling programs, but you can solve the problem at the source: your purchase. Learn more...

Read more

wrapping paper

This holiday season, our paper consumption will dramatically increase because of gift wrapping. Depending on where you live and what the wrapping paper is made out of, a lot of it will be single-use and non-recyclable.

Read more

dish soap

The impact your dish soap has varies depending on local/state laws where you live. Potential causes for concern: phosphates causing algal blooms, the plastic container may not be recyclable, and your water treatment plant may not filter out all chemical ingredients. Learn more...

Read more

plastic wrap

While some cities recycling centers may take #2, #3, and #4 plastics, plastic film most likely will be headed to the landfill due to its stretchy nature which jams machinery at recycling centers as well as the fact it’s often soiled with food. Learn more...

Read more

paper towels

Paper towel usage has a huge impact on the number of trees cut down, pollution (from chemicals used during the process), and landfill waste (about 3,000 tons in the US). If every household in the US made the decision to use one less roll, we could save up to ~544,000 trees a year! Learn more...

Read more

toothbrush

If you replace your toothbrush as frequently as recommended, you will dispose of around 300 toothbrushes throughout your lifetime contributing to the one billion thrown away in the US every year. Learn more...

Read more

food storage

According to a USDA study, about 31% of our food supply goes uneaten. Storing our food properly and efficiently can help combat this waste while saving you money and keeping your kitchen organized. Learn more...

Read more

clothing

In 2007, Americans threw away more than 68 pounds of clothing and textiles per person per year, and clothing and other textiles represented about 4% of the municipal solid waste—numbers that have continued to grow

Read more

shaving

According to the EPA, around 2 billion disposable razors add to our municipal waste every year because they are single use plastic and not taken by most recycling centers. Learn more...

Read more

drinking straws

An estimated *500 million* straws are used and discarded in the US every day. The cons: straws are rarely recyclable, cannot biodegrade, add to our marine pollution, and have become part of our food chain by being ingested by marine and land animals

Read more

laundry detergent

Chemical ingredients used in laundry detergent can be toxic to aquatic organisms and algae, persist in the environment longer than intended, cause eutrophication of freshwater, and are likely linked to health problems in humans

Read more

wiping your butt

Toilet paper contributes to deforestation, damages ecosystems with chemicals, guzzles up a lot of water, and uses high-energy techniques in production.

Read more